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Sessions was a big validator for conservatives who weren't quite sure Trump would do what he said

Sessions was a big validator for conservatives who weren't quite sure Trump would do what he said. We discuss how publicly humiliating him can backfire & is making the base uneasy.

"Those days when Ivanka can lay her head on the desk and cry are over

"Those days when Ivanka can lay her head on the desk and cry are over." Bannon thought he had everything under control. Then he didn't. Our look inside the final days.

Bannon sees Dem overreach on race and the politics of who's more oppressed

Bannon sees Dem overreach on race and the politics of who's more oppressed. “Just give me more. Tear down more statues. Say the revolution is coming. I can’t get enough of it," he told me.

Listen

Listen.... God Knows my heart in this situation
IF You don't like the way I've decided to Deal with this #Philadephia sept 2 booking, that's Fine!.... Do YOUR part!
And FYI a piece of my booking also went into the LBGTQA Fund for black and brown people as well!... so before you others sit outside and Attempt to judge me... you don't know enough to...

Why is it always people with the least amount of Accomplishments AND Followers always talkin about how irrelevant you are when you ain't even know...

Why is it always people with the least amount of Accomplishments AND Followers always talkin about how irrelevant you are when you ain't even know they was alive? ‍♀️#askingforafriend #TsMadison

Ok so here is my First statement about the Philadelphia Club situation

Ok so here is my First statement about the Philadelphia Club situation.....
Video to follow
I'm gone hurt a couple of you heauxs feelings so please gather round
Thanks in advance #TsMadison

This is going to be such an amazing intimate evening of conversation with Dr

This is going to be such an amazing intimate evening of conversation with Dr. Willie Parker and Lizz Winstead about the state of reproductive rights. For more information and to reserve your spot in this lovely, limited space:

This is my friend Lizz Winstead

This is my friend Lizz Winstead. Ignore the headline. It doesn't really say anything about her. She's a special talent, and one of our foremost feminists in seek of justice. We are lucky to share the planet with Lizz.

Need help! Was walking down the street in Miami and a woman came out of her house grabbed my bottle of water started walking away and through it in...

Need help! Was walking down the street in Miami and a woman came out of her house grabbed my bottle of water started walking away and through it in the bushes. When I took out my camera to film her she hit me and ran back inside her house. Cops came and she won't open the door. They tell me there's nothing they can do bc they can't break door for "simple battery." Um, when is battery ever "simple?" Oh yeah, when it doesn't result in one's death. Anyway her neighbor comes out and says she has physically assaulted quite a few people before and that she's a racist but she always locks herself in her house on 233 First St bet Collins and Washington. This woman needs to be arrested before someone gets hurt! What can I do to get this woman behind bars?! Attorneys, activists, social change agents pls help! I need your advise.

Hysteria is fear that is out of proportion to the cause, whether external or internal

Hysteria is fear that is out of proportion to the cause, whether external or internal. social or emotional. So I'm slightly mystified by Samuel Moyn's co-authored op-ed in the NYT. I don't think our fears of Trump's barking idiocies, on Charlottesville or North Korea or climate change or Obama or Clinton, are out of proportion to these causes. Just the opposite--the man is a threat to democracy as well as civility. Just ask Richard Spencer or David Duke.
Moreover, I am not convinced that the so-called hysteria of our time can or will distract the Left from the fundamental economic problems of our time--nor that the anti-Communist crusade of the Cold War did so. I think, in fact, that this attitude or approach covertly reinstates the base/superstrucrure model of political and ideological change which has misled the Left for generations. Besides, after Occupy Wall Street and Thomas Piketty, economic inequality is permanently engraved in normal political discourse.

You're right, I spend too much time at FB--fuck you, too--but here's the memo that got one more crazy canned by the general(s) in charge of the WH

You're right, I spend too much time at FB--fuck you, too--but here's the memo that got one more crazy canned by the general(s) in charge of the WH. Straight out of Bannon's demented playbook, where "cultural Marxist memes," the Frankfurt School, and the Left writ large control the political discourse of our time.
Now, I once wrote an essay for Jacobin entitled "How the Left Has Won," so you could say he's just repeating after me. Instead of making fun of me, or this fucking moron, you might want to ask why people who are not merely delusional--emphasis on the merely--believe that the Left has already achieved hegemony, but doesn't know what to do about it.
He's right, the poor schmuck, we won the Culture Wars. Now what?
P.S. Tread carefully when it comes to how "the bankers" oppose Trump. Or get out your copies of Klaus Theweleit and Robert O. Paxton, refresh your memories of this phrasing: Jews, socialists, Communists, feminists, bankers, these are all of a piece of the same puzzle.

John Yoo

John Yoo, they're coming for you next, and if they don't--I'd actually prefer this outcome--fine, live a long, long life, and in your old age keep asking yourself, How could I have justified the torture of these men, on what grounds, out of what panic, or sense of duty to moral derelicts like Dick Cheney? Near the end, I hope you ask, Where was my soul? And where is it now?

I'm writing a memoir, of course, who isn't, and I just realized, in commenting on a dear colleague's post about the departure of her hairdresser,...

I'm writing a memoir, of course, who isn't, and I just realized, in commenting on a dear colleague's post about the departure of her hairdresser, that over the 30 years i cut my own hair, electric razor, scissors and all, I was also a vegetarian (of sorts), denying myself the pleasures--the sins--of eating my fellow animals.
How did these renunciations coincide? That's my new question.
There is already a chapter in the memoir called "My Life as a Dog," in which I explain my attachment to, and identification with, the three Weimaraners who populated, punctuated, and, to be honest about it, presided over my three marriages. Alex, Harry, Murray.
Alex endured all three wives, like me. He was also run over by a truck, and survived. Harry, well, he was too decent a human being--I mean this, I never met a more thoughtful, kind, and gentle person--to get through the last one. Murray was a lunatic, all energy, no brain. Like me, he just ran away from every command. I never liked him.
I've written about my "fall" from vegetarianism, if that's still an ism, in Against Thrift, the Coda, "Bataille Made me Do it." My departure from DIY on my own balding scalp is still untold.
I'll call this chapter "The Hair of the Dog."

Let's do this

Let's do this. I mean, let's buy it, people. I'm talking about William James's summer home. The banks don't know what to do with their money, make them loan it to us.

"I give my heart so easily to the rumour of this world

"I give my heart so easily to the rumour of this world." That's how country music turns gossip and cliche into poetry. Alison Krauss again. I'd better go to sleep.

Hi, my name is Jim, and I'm a pill-crunching constituent of the opioid epidemic--but I've now gone a week without hydrocodone and its more seductive...

Hi, my name is Jim, and I'm a pill-crunching constituent of the opioid epidemic--but I've now gone a week without hydrocodone and its more seductive antecedent, oxycodone. Been popping these pills since the end of April, when my hip cracked and I stopped walking like a normal sapien.
It's hard to withdraw. Imagine cold sweats, shakes, nausea, and insomnia, all at once. There you go. What do you do? Well, there's aspirin, ibuprofen, and there's alcohol. I can't rely on alcohol, too dangerous for me--next thing you know, they find me in Albuquerque lecturing to a dumpster on pragmatism, having forgotten where I parked the A4, maybe in fucking Santa Fe.
So it's NSAIDs, gobbled as if they're vitamins delivered to a rickety adolescent. And exercise, always an antidote to whatever ails you this minute. Also, cooking or shopping, interchangeable moments in a schedule that requires more repression than you think. Right now I'm assembling the spices for a killer chili, cinnamon and chocolate high on the list.
Soon I'll rest. Call it sleep.

Like I said, you can't link to "Hamlet, James, and the Woman Question" except maybe by way of Google books

Like I said, you can't link to "Hamlet, James, and the Woman Question" except maybe by way of Google books. It's Chapter 5 of Pragmatism, Feminism, and Democracy (2001). Or if you have library privileges, the original version was in Raritan, vol 17 (1997). It's pretty funny, all things considered, because it marked one of those few times in my life where I could not, for the life of me, understand how my rivals had arrived at their opposite conclusions about both young and old Will.

I woke up at 2:00 AM to find a real estate link in my email--it seems William James's summer home in Chocorua NH is on the market

I woke up at 2:00 AM to find a real estate link in my email--it seems William James's summer home in Chocorua NH is on the market. This is where he died in 1910, of congestive heart failure, at my age. So my inclination is to buy it and turn it into a shrine, a destination worthy of American pilgrimage. If you build it, they will come, right? But shoot, it's already there. Not that I can afford it, but still.
For people like me, who were and are profoundly shaped by their intellectual encounter with this strange, frail man, a mystic, seer, psychologist, philosopher, and occasional drug addict who loved hiking all over upstate and New England, it's not easy to explain his appeal. That is probably due to the deceptively simple, colloquial tenor of his prose. Bertrand Russell couldn't get over it; nor could Lewis Mumford: both were repelled by his insistent "financial metaphors."
But the fact is that he revolutionized two disciplines, psychology and philosophy, between 1890 and 1909. He was a man with no formal training in either discipline. How did he pull that off? He inspired and informed the intellectual itineraries of thinkers as profound, and different, as Henri Bergson, Edmund Husserl, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Carl Schmitt, Jean Wahl, Georges Sorel, Giovanni Papini, Walter Lippmann, W. E. B. Du Bois, Jane Addams, Gilles Deleuze . . . . The list is endless.
A long time ago I wrote about his nervous breakdown, ca. 1869-1872, as a kind of self-medication. Watching James go through his torments made my own seem silly, and dispensable. The published result was a fugitive piece called "Hamlet, James, and the Woman Question." You can't Google it.
I have two framed pictures of this person, this Will James, in my apartment. They supervise my comings and goings from atop a book shelf crammed with obscure texts that purport to interpret pragmatism--including my own. One is a self-portrait he did on the eve of that breakdown, in charcoal. He looks at me from an angle, out of the corner of his eye, and his frightened expression is a warning, maybe to himself: don't come any closer, it says.
The other is a photograph from 1892. He stares at me, hands almost folded, with unconcealed suspicion. He's 50 years old now, and he's all dressed up in a suit and tie, but he looks like an ancient prophet out of the Old Testament. Having completed The Principles of Psychology, published in 1890, he also looks exhausted. Can't blame him for that.
My favorite characterizations of this person, which will have to suffice as explanation of his appeal, come from very different sources. C. I. Lewis, a student of Royce and James at Harvard who would become a pragmatist philosopher in his own right, said: "James, I thought, had a swift way of being right, but how he reached his conclusions was his own secret."
Winifred Smith Rieber, who was commissioned to paint a group portrait of the Harvard philosophy department in 1906, said: "his mind seemed to have blown in on a storm."
James himself was contemptuous of academic protocols--the dignities attached to the professorial life. "A 'gentleman' is a man who cares nothing for his life," he declared. Or again: "The Prince of darkness may be a gentleman, as we are told he is, but, whatever the God of earth and heaven is, he can surely be no gentleman." H. G. Wells tells us that Will climbed a ladder to get a glimpse of G. K. Chesterton in his garden.
Hell yes, fuck yeah. Not that I can afford it, but still.

"The August 14 New York Times reported that the threat by Donald Trump to use the US military against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas...

"The August 14 New York Times reported that the threat by Donald Trump to use the US military against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has brought together Latin American leaders, divided on other things, in opposition to US intervention. Along the way, reporter Nicholas Casey cites a regional expert who says, “An often ugly history of US interventions is vividly remembered in Latin America — even as we in the US have forgotten.” Which the Times followed thus:
Under President Barack Obama, however, Washington aimed to get past the conflicts by building wider consensus over regional disputes. In 2009, after the Honduran military removed the leftist president Manuel Zelaya from power in a midnight coup, the United States joined other countries in trying to broker—albeit unsuccessfully—a deal for his return.
There’s a word for that kind of statement, and the word is “lie.” READ MORE:

"The North Korean government, according to the Western media is said to be oppressing and impoverishing its population

"The North Korean government, according to the Western media is said to be oppressing and impoverishing its population.
Here in the USA we have medicare, all our kids are educated, we are all literate, and “we want to live in America”.
And in the DPRK, the health system sucks, they don’t have schools and hospital beds, they are all a bunch of illiterates,
You would not want to live there!
Beneath the mountain of media disinformation, there is more than meets the eye. Despite sanctions and military threats, not to mention the failed intent of “respectable” human rights organizations (including Amnesty International) to distort the facts, North Korea’s “health system is the envy of the developing world” according to the Director General of the World Health Organization:
“WHO director-general Margaret Chan said the country had “no lack of doctors and nurses””." READ MORE:

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